YSU HOSTS DISTINGUISHED PHYSICIST

Michio Kaku speaks in front of a filled Stambaugh Auditorium. Kaku, author of several books about the advances of modern science, spoke on his work concerning the mind and the nervous system, as well as previewed the leaps the scientific community has made in the past few years.

Michio Kaku speaks in front of a filled Stambaugh Auditorium. Kaku, author of several books about the advances of modern science, spoke on his work concerning the mind and the nervous system, as well as previewed the leaps the scientific community has made in the past few years.

Youngstown State University’s Department of Physics and Astronomy, partnered with the Skeggs Lecture Series, welcomed physicist Michio Kaku on March 20 at Stambaugh Auditorium.

Kaku brought his “theory of everything” lecture to downtown Youngstown. Kaku has appeared on various science documentaries for the Discovery Channel, Science Channel and the BBC.

The author of several books, including the New York Times best-sellers “Physics of the Future” and “Physics of the Impossible,” Kaku hosts a weekly syndicated radio program and has been a staple on such popular television science programs as “How the Universe Works.” His textbooks are required study for many in the fields of physics and astronomy.

A graduate of Harvard, Kaku obtained his doctorate in physics from the University of California. His works spans four decades, three of which he has spent as the Henry Semat Chair in theoretical physics at the City University of New York, where he also currently serves as a professor.

Kaku discussed “Explorations in Science” during his visit. He touched base on his life’s work and research, string field theory. String field theory is derived from string theory, toady’s leading theory summarizing the mechanics of the known universe.

His work attempts to pick up where Einstein’s left off, looking to develop an equation for the “theory of everything,” that will simplify and explain the physical laws of the universe.

During his time, Kaku spoke on dozens of advancements making their waves through modern science.

“At John Hopkins University, they have now created a mechanical arm as good as the real thing. This mechanical arm was funded by the United State Pentagon. The Pentagon realizes that there are thousands of wounded warrior from Iraq and Afghanistan: spinal cord injuries, no arms, no legs. Why not give them the gift of life? These arms are so delicate, you could pick up an egg shell without breaking it. You can high five; you can fist bump,” Kaku said. “In addition, complete exoskeletons are next.”

Mike Crescimanno, a YSU professor in the physics and astronomy department, said he was very happy students had the unique opportunity to experience what he believes is brilliant work.

“Very excited — this is a great opportunity for students to study and learn from one of the greatest minds of our time. Anytime we have an opportunity to promote science on this kind of level is good in and of itself,” Crescimanno said.

Daniel Catello, a senior Math major, attended the lecture and enjoyed it.

“Dr. Kaku’s lecture was a good down to earth insight for the public to see the cutting edge field of science today,” Catello said.

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