Holy tits, Muhammad!

By now you’ve probably heard about, or even seen, the Duchess of Cambridge’s bare chest.

If you haven’t, here’s a quick rundown.

Kate and William were sunbathing at a private chateau in France. She was topless. From afar, an unknown photographer snapped a picture now seen by millions of eyes around the world. The Royal Family is livid.

Meanwhile, in the Middle East, riots continue. Incited partially by an anti-Muslim film, the angry mobs have already claimed the life of one U.S. ambassador and threatened the security of countless others.

With Monday being the 225th anniversary of the Constitution’s ratification, we feel compelled to sympathize with the nefarious duo portrayed as villains by most of the world.

Our rights in America aren’t absolute. Fortunately, the Constitution often serves as a necessary safeguard for reasonable behavior.

Basseley Nakoula’s film “Innocence of Muslims” was shoddy work that pales in comparison to some episodes of “Jack Up The Rev,” but his crime against taste does not deserve such a violent reaction.

The publication that published the topless photos of royalty now faces both a civil suit and criminal charges. France’s privacy laws differ from ours, especially in regards to secret, public photographs.

Whatever the ethics behind nude photos and blasphemous films, the right to disseminate information should be held more sacred than the royal family or a false god.  

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